Be Careful with Summertime Workouts

Running man silhouette in sunset time

You know that you need to exercise at least 30 minutes per day, five days per week. And you also know that changing up your workout is the best way to prevent boredom and stay on track toward your goals. But during the summer you may find that you’re feeling less than motivated to get off the couch. It’s hot outside, and your workouts may have transitioned from “invigorating” to “miserable” at this point in the year. Not to mention, we are all at increased risk of heat exhaustion and heat stroke during the summer.

But the last thing you want to do is stay indoors all summer! Stay safe and comfortable by following these tips for comfortable exercise when it’s hot outside.

Dress for success. Choose clothing made from breathable fabrics like microfibers, which are designed to help sweat evaporate and keep your body cool during exercise. Remember to use a sunblock, and wear a hat or visor to keep the sun out of your eyes.

Hydrate! You already run the risk of dehydration any time you exercise, but it can be downright dangerous in the summer. Make sure to drink 16 ounces of water before you work out, take sips of water while you’re exercising, and down another 16 ounces afterward. Either take a water bottle with you, or plan your walking or jogging route so that you pass by several water fountains.

Time your workouts better. Exercising during the middle of the day, when the sun is at full strength, puts you at increased risk of heat stroke and dehydration. Even if you get through the workout just fine, it will be considerably less enjoyable! Try to time your workouts for early morning or late afternoon instead.

Chill out. You might find that starting your workout feeling chilled will help you keep going longer. Take a quick dip in the pool, run through a sprinkler, wrap a cold wet towel around your neck, or even take a cold shower right before heading outdoors. Do this again at the end of your workout to cool down.

Listen to your body. If you experience nausea, dizziness, or fatigue, you might be experiencing heat exhaustion. Head indoors to an air conditioned spot, and drink some water immediately.

Filed under: Healthcare Tax credits for small businesses California, Healthy Living Tips, Heat Stroke